PNCWA2018 Opening Session

An Old Industry in a New Era: Business Opportunities for the Next 50 Years

Monday, October 22, 8:30-10AM, Boise Centre East 400C

Agenda

8:30 Welcome and Introductions by David Keil, PNCWA President
8:35 Watershed Governance as an Ecosystem Services Opportunity
Keith Hirokawa, Professor of Law, Albany Law School
9:00 Cities Lead: Innovation and the Future of Water
Holli Woodings, City Councilmember, City of Boise
9:20 WEF’s Looking to the Future
Jackie Jarrell, Operations Chief, Charlotte Water (North Carolina) and President, Water Environment Federation (WEF)       
9:28 The “New” Water Research Foundation and Clean Water Technologies for the Next 50 Years
Amit Pramanik, Chief Innovation and Development Officer, Water Research Foundation
9:35 Questions & Answers
9:45 Scholarship Announcements/Presentations
Andy McCaskill, 2018 Scholarship Committee
9:55 Conference Announcements
Chris Horgan, 2018 Conference Chair
10:00 Adjourn

 

The focus for the opening session and many of the technical presentations in the following days will be on how our industry can be creative, reevaluate our foundational strengths, and evolve to meet future challenges like growth, regulations, and a changing workforce. We’re especially interested in sharing knowledge throughout the conference related to improving our business practices, including how we operate our facilities, implement technologies, leverage our data, and plan for future investments.

The Opening Session will start that conversation with the following guest speakers:

Keith Hirokawa, Professor of Law, Albany Law School
Keith Hirokawa will begin the keynote topic with a presentation on Watershed Governance as an Ecosystem Services Opportunity. He joined the faculty at Albany Law School in 2009 where he teaches courses involving environmental and natural resources law, land use planning, property law, and jurisprudence. Professor Hirokawa's scholarship has explored convergences in ecology, ethics, economics, and law, with particular attention given to local environmental law, ecosystem services policy, watershed management, and environmental impact analysis. He has authored dozens of professional and scholarly articles in these areas and has edited several books, including Greening Local Government (2012), Environmental Law and Contrasting Ideas of Nature: A Constructivist Approach (2014), and Rethinking Sustainable Development to Meet the Climate Change Challenge (2015). Prior to joining the faculty at Albany Law, Professor Hirokawa was an Associate Professor at Texas Wesleyan University School of Law and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Oregon, School of Law. Professor Hirokawa practiced land use and environmental law in Oregon and Washington and was heavily involved with community groups and nonprofit organizations.
 
Holli Woodings, City Council member, City of Boise

Holli Woodings began her term on the Boise City Council in January 2018. She serves as the City Council liaison to Public Works, the Air Quality Board, the Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho (COMPASS), and co-chairs Energize our Neighborhoods. Holli served as a State Representative for District 19 in Idaho’s 72nd Legislature. Prior to that, she helped develop and finance Idaho’s largest wind energy farm, founded Woodings Group, a consultancy specializing in startup energy companies, and co-founded the Idaho Clean Energy Association. The Idaho Clean Energy Association is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of renewable energy, energy efficiency and their associated technologies in the State of Idaho. One of the goals of the association is to educate Idaho’s citizens on the opportunities to use energy resources efficiently and develop Idaho’s own clean energy resources.

Sustainable Boise is a citywide initiative centered on strategies that create lasting environments, innovative enterprises, and vibrant communities. This initiative demonstrates the City's commitment to lead through policies and projects that ensure the sustainability of the community, economy and environment. Around water resources, Boise City has established programs, goals, and initiatives to support water protection and water conservation efforts. Those efforts include:

  • Operating two wastewater treatment facilities that give renewed life to nearly 30 million gallons of used water daily
  • Operating the first Class A Struvite Production Facility that uses phosphorus harvested from the wastewater treatment process to be sold as fertilizer.
  • Participating in the Lower Boise Watershed Council, a planning group that provides advice on water quality improvement plans
Holli’s mix of business acumen and public service, both aligned to a strong interest in sustainability, make her an ideal speaker for the Opening Session as we look toward the next 50 years.
 
Jacqueline A. Jarrell, Operations Chief of Charlotte Water, Charlotte, North Carolina and WEF Vice President

Jackie Jarrell, P.E., is the 2017-2018 Vice President of the Water Environment Federation. Jackie will speak to the topic of An Old Industry in a New Era from both the WEF perspective and her own perspective based on many years serving in the industry.

Jackie has been with Charlotte Water for more than 25 years. For the past 15 years, she has been responsible for the overall management of the operation and maintenance of five wastewater treatment facilities consisting of a total capacity of 123 million gallons per day (MGD), with the largest plant permitted at 64 MGD. She is also responsible for the related Residuals Program, producing more than 90,000 wet tons/ year, and the Industrial Pretreatment Program, with more than 60 significant industrial users. Recently, Jackie serves as the Operations Chief responsible for wastewater operations, and includes oversight of regulatory functions, process control, industrial pretreatment and continuous improvement programs within the operations areas.

As a WEF member, Jackie has held multiple leadership and committee roles, including serving as the chair of the Utility Management Program Symposia and the first vice chair of the Utility Management Committee. She is an active member of the North Carolina Water Environment Association (NCWEA) and is also actively involved with the North Carolina Water Quality Association, a regulatory advocacy organization of utilities in North Carolina, and is a past chair and a current board member.

Jackie is a registered professional engineer in the state of North Carolina and holds a Biological Wastewater Grade II OIT. In 2015, Jackie, along with her colleagues, was awarded the Gascoigne Wastewater Treatment Plant Operational Improvement Medal.